Pets And Travel During Holidays

As summertime approaches, so do holiday plans.  Whether you plan to bring your pet along on your vacation or leave your pet at home, we have some tips and thoughts for each option.

Travelling Together

What could be better than going on holidays with your pet? You are together with your fur-buddy, you don’t have to worry about how your pet is doing without you, and you’re making new memories.

The downside is that many pets don’t travel well.  There is always some stress associated with travel, and many pets are anxious in new situations. Most importantly, the logistics of keeping your pet physically safe while flying or driving must be addressed.

Flying

Different airlines have different requirements.  A flight for a dog that is larger than the allowed cabin kennel size (which differs depending on the airplane/airline) carries risks, especially if there are stops or transfers on the itinerary.  … Continue reading

Lily Toxicity in Cats

Easter is around the corner and we’ve already had two cases of lily toxicity here at Canada West. Now is the time to review how certain species of lilies cause kidney failure in our feline friends.

It has been pointed out that every time holidays roll around I’m doom and gloom about the possible hazards. Fair enough! There’s a reason we call them the “chocolate holidays”. But while most people now know to keep chocolate away from dogs, they may not know that the lily they were given might kill their cat.

Several species of lilies are toxic to cats, including Easter lilies, Stargazer, Tiger, Japanese, Asian and day lilies. The toxic species are either from the lilium family or the Hemerocallis family (true and day lilies)

It is important to note that all parts of the lily (the flowers, pollen, leaves and stems) are toxic in even very small … Continue reading

Mobility in Older Dogs

As promised in our previous post on living with geriatric pets, this is a look at modifying the environment for the aging dog and making sure they aren’t in pain. Pets that are in pain don’t get as much exercise as they would otherwise, and as with people are more likely to have other health issues including weight gain, skin problems, urinary tract infections, and muscle wasting. In other words, pain contributes to the overall frailty associated with old age. Pain can also hinder efforts to have a full bowel movement; a painful pet may defecate only enough to relieve the pressure in the colon but not enough to fully empty their bowels. As they sleep, the sphincter relaxes and then when they get up, the abdominal pressure/relaxed sphincter combination can result in fecal incontinence.

Diagnosis

If you’ve noticed a change in behaviour in your dog, is it “something” or … Continue reading