Blog

Case Report:  Naughty Bruce Wayne & The Naproxen Caper

The mischievous Bruce Wayne recently visited the Canada West Emergency Room under less than ideal circumstances.  Bruce Wayne is a young French bulldog described by his owners as having an extremely quirky personality and a sincere love of eating. He had been found chewing on a new bottle of Naproxen (sold under the brand names “Aleve” and “Naprosen” among others) with the lid off and with the coating licked off of several pills.  It was unclear how many pills Bruce might have eaten, but it was reported that it may have been up to ten pills.

Naproxen is part of the family of drugs known as non-steroidal anti-imflammatories (NSAIDs) and discussed in more detail in our recent post on mobility for older dogs.  Prior to the development in recent years of more specific animal-approved NSAIDS, naproxen was occasionally used in dogs but at much lower dose and much less frequency … Continue reading “Case Report:  Naughty Bruce Wayne & The Naproxen Caper”

Parvovirus in Dogs

We have seen 3 cases of canine parvovirus (CPV) in the past few weeks.

Parvovirus is one of the most common causes of infectious diarrhea in puppies and young dogs. It is a highly contagious and often fatal disease.  Certain breeds are more susceptible, as are dogs with other concurrent issues (parasites or other intestinal disease-causing bacteria).

Prevention

Vaccination is effective but there can be complications with giving the vaccine too early (it may not be effective because of the maternal antibodies and there is a period of time where the pup may not be protected). Please speak to your family veterinarian about a particular vaccine regimen and the period of time to keep the pups with mom so that they can benefit from passive immunity

Until the full series of vaccine is complete, it is recommended to keep pups away from dog parks or socializing with unvaccinated dogs.

More

Continue reading “Parvovirus in Dogs”

Alert: Hills Pet Nutrition – Voluntary Dog Food Recall Extended to Canada Feb 1, 2019

**ALERT – DOG PET PARENTS**

Hills Pet Nutrition – Voluntary Dog Food Recall Extended to Canada Feb 1, 2019

 

Canada West received notice within the past 24 hours that some batches of canned dog food produced by Hills Pet Nutrition are under a voluntary recall notice that has been extended to Canada.

The issue concerns a Hills supplier error resulting in the potential for elevated vitamin D levels that was confirmed after an investigation carried out by Hills.

Read the full notice that includes information about symptoms, prognosis and what to do to obtain a refund on the products purchased HERE: [https://www.hillspet.ca/en-ca/productlist]

Canada West has removed the following products from our shelves:

C/D Canine multicare 12.5 oz
I/D Canine 13oz
K/D Canine 13oz
Z/D Canine 13oz
Science Diet Adult Chicken and Beef Entree

Pet Parents, if you purchased any of the products listed above from Canada West

Continue reading “Alert: Hills Pet Nutrition – Voluntary Dog Food Recall Extended to Canada Feb 1, 2019”

Mobility in Older Dogs

As promised in our previous post on living with geriatric pets, this is a look at modifying the environment for the aging dog and making sure they aren’t in pain. Pets that are in pain don’t get as much exercise as they would otherwise, and as with people are more likely to have other health issues including weight gain, skin problems, urinary tract infections, and muscle wasting. In other words, pain contributes to the overall frailty associated with old age. Pain can also hinder efforts to have a full bowel movement; a painful pet may defecate only enough to relieve the pressure in the colon but not enough to fully empty their bowels. As they sleep, the sphincter relaxes and then when they get up, the abdominal pressure/relaxed sphincter combination can result in fecal incontinence.

Diagnosis

If you’ve noticed a change in behaviour in your dog, is it “something” or … Continue reading “Mobility in Older Dogs”

(Un)healthy appetite

As the holiday season approaches, this is a bit of a cautionary tale and a reminder that dogs can be, at times, indiscriminate eaters…and that “dietary indiscretions” can sometimes result in a foreign body that gets lodged in the digestive tract and has to be removed by scoping or by surgery.

In Millan’s case, our adventurous 8-month-old labrador, surgery was required to remove a deflated football from his stomach!

We see him here with the usual “I’ve had the belly surgery haircut” and then further into his recovery, a beautiful picture of him on the beach.

Again, our best wishes for the holidays and reminding you to keep an eye out for our mischevious furry family members!

 

 

 

Continue reading “(Un)healthy appetite”

Xylitol toxicity in dogs

In our last post about cannabis, a commenter noted that some CBD oil are sweetened by xylitol and that xylitol is toxic to dogs.

Given that astute comment, I thought I would do a brief post on xylitol toxicity in dogs.

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener (lower calorie alternative to sugar) that used in gums, oral care and baked products to name a few.

As far as we know, xylitol is only toxic in dogs.  In no other specie does xylitol stimulate an insulin release but, in dogs, it causes a rapid insulin release which can result in profound hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Dogs that eat up to 0.1 mg/kg are at risk for hypoglycemia while higher doses (0.5mg/kg) can develop acute liver failure.   The mechanism for the acute liver failure is unknown.

Signs of low blood sugar can develop within 30 mns or be delayed if the substance ingested … Continue reading “Xylitol toxicity in dogs”